Mailing a Sample in Wisconsin

MAIL SAMPLES TO:

Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic (PDDC)
Department of Plant Pathology
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1630 Linden Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1598

Please enclose a cover letter with your sample(s) that includes your complete mailing address, your telephone number and/or your email address, and a brief description of the problem you having with your plant(s).

HOW TO PACKAGE A SAMPLE

Potted Plants
Place the pot in a plastic bag and * LOOSELY * tie the top of the bag around the stem of the plant using string or a wire twist tie. This will keep the soil from contaminating the leaves. Place the wrapped plant in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Whole Plants
If you have removed the soil from the roots of the plant, wrap the roots in moist (*NOT WET*) paper towels. Place the wrapped roots in a plastic bag and *LOOSELY* tie the top of the bag around the stem of the plant using string or a wire twist tie. *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag.

If you need to leave soil attached to the root system (e.g., because you believe a nematode is causing your disease problem), place the root system directly in the bag and * LOOSELY * tie the top of the bag around the stem of the plant using string or a wire twist tie. *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag.

Place the wrapped plant in a sturdy box.  Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Leaves
Place six to 12 leaves loosely in a plastic bag.  *DO NOT* wrap them in moistened paper towels, but place a wad of moist (* NOT WET *) paper toweling in the bottom corner of the plastic bag.  Tie or otherwise seal the bag closed. *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag. Place the bagged leaves in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Seedlings
Remove seedlings from the soil and * GENTLY * wash them. Lay them on a moist ( * NOT WET * ) paper towel; cover them with another moist paper towel. Place the seedlings and toweling between two pieces of cardboard and put the sandwiched seedlings into a plastic bag. Tie or otherwise seal the bag closed. *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag. Place the wrapped seedlings in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Deciduous Woody Branches
Cut branches into sections if necessary. Place the branches/branch pieces in a plastic bag and tie or otherwise seal the bag closed.  If sending more than one branch (we typically recommend sending at least three), put branch pieces from different branches in different bags. Place the bagged branches in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Evergreen Branches
Cut branches into sections if necessary. Place the branches/branch pieces in a plastic bag and tie or otherwise seal the bag closed.  If sending more than one branch (we typically recommend sending at least three), put branch pieces from different branches in different bags. Place the bagged branches in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Fleshy Fruits and Vegetables
Wrap fruits and vegetables in dry newspaper. Place the wrapped fruit/vegetable in a plastic bag and tie or otherwise seal the bag closed. *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag. Place the bagged material in a sturdy box. Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

Roots
*GENTLY* wash roots to remove excess soil. Wrap roots in moist (*NOT WET*) paper towels and place them in a plastic bag.  Tie or otherwise seal the bag closed.  *DO NOT* punch holes in the bag. Place the wrapped roots in a sturdy box.  Use packing material to ensure that the sample won’t shift during shipment.

University of Wisconsin-Madison